e-Learning Blog

Reflections on the Knowledge Society

  1. Algorithmic accountability or black box
    There have been persistent calls for transparency and algorithmic accountability in learning analytics. Quite recently, there was a discussion at an LASI event in Denmark on that topic. There are good arguments for more transparency in developing and delivering learning analytics products. Presumably, teachers can derive better informed interventions from visualisations of learning data when […]
  2. IT architecture in the shadow of the Cloud
    Here is an interesting summary of the challenges of organisational IT architectures. While in previous (now almost prehistoric) architectures the so-called Managed Learning Environment (MLE) was built with the intent of an all-integrated systems and single sign-on architecture, nowadays, Shadow IT services are booming. A lot of learning services are run in the Cloud, including […]
  3. Student evaluations of teaching is nonsense!
    Ha! Finally, a study that confirms what was general knowledge anyhow, among non-decision makers! Student evaluations of their teachers have no correlation to their learning. Who would have guessed?! Filling in a couple of questions at the end of term, if anything, indicates at the most popularity, not quality or progress. Male teachers seem to […]
  4. Trusted learning analytics
    There is much uncertainty about ethics and privacy in learning analytics which hampers wider adoption. In a recent article for LAK16, Hendrik Drachsler and I tried to show ways in which trusted learning analytics can be established compliant with existing legislation and the forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) by the European Commission, which will […]
  5. Four myths about personalisation of learning
    Personalisation is often hailed as a remedy for the “one-size-fits-all” teaching approach. The idea of personalised learning is tightly connected to technology, because it is generally accepted that human resources are limited and not scalable into a one-on-one teaching ratio. Of course, the semantics involved in technology enabled personalisation differs completely from human-to-human personal interactions. […]

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